King Loshemanesh

This document was found in the Hall of Kings on Ae’gura.

Loshemanesh - Took the throne in 4291 at the age of 123. Though Loshemanesh’s reign was relatively short, it is believed he made the most of the years he was given.

Loshemanesh had seen first-hand the affects of too much interaction with other cultures and because of that held firmly to his views, disagreeing with what was becoming the majority view in D’ni. He often pointed out, as his father also had, that before the Pento War, strict regulations had existed on interaction with other cultures and it did nothing to stop the Judges from their writings. Loshemanesh himself stated, “Those who wish to take advantage of outside Ages and peoples can not be stopped…must first be listened to within D’ni…not forced to take such extreme measures. …When extreme measures are taken…the consequences must be increased.”1.

In 4305 law was passed stating that creation or trading of illicit Ages was punishable by permanent imprisonment on solitary Prison Ages…a fate that some said was worse than death. In 4307 Loshemanesh passed (barely) another law stating that any D’ni who coerced an outsider to commit a crime (no matter what the crime) was also punishable by permanent imprisonment.

While the laws were passed, Loshemanesh encouraged further interaction with the other cultures, while continuing to argue interaction itself was not the problem. However, it seems as though many failed to see his stance and still pushed for stricter measures on the Guild of Writers and a complete sealing off of any interaction with outsiders.

In 4334, the Age of Trases (a major mining Age) was halfway destroyed because of the mistake of a native running D’ni machines that had been established there. Families were forced to evacuate and, in one particularly odd case, supposedly a child was born while the mother had been linking from Trases back to D’ni. Regardless, the destruction of the Age was another cause of argument for those who wished to seal themselves off and a case that Loshemanesh argued could have happened regardless of who was running the machine.

Sadly, in 4438 Loshemanesh was assassinated by the same faction who had kidnapped his mother years earlier, making his life an example of what he had often preached; it was the D’ni who had to change. If they did not, he had argued, problems would always exist, whether or not outsiders were involved.

He left the throne to the first-son of his younger brother, as he had no children of his own.


  1. Taken from a public speech explaining his signing of the laws