King Mararon

This document was found in the Hall of Kings on Ae’gura.

King Mararon took the throne in 997 at the age of 73, exactly twenty years after emerging from his long coma. From various speeches and writings, it’s obvious Mararon placed a strong value on life. Through his 162 years in power it seems he did all he could to emphasize that same value to his people, as well as make the most of his own.

It seems that a main concern of Mararon was the Díni education system. The fact that so many of his own people were falling by the wayside apparently upset him quite a bit. So, in 1124 when Ti’Lanar (a Guild Master of the Guild of Legislators) submitted his paper “Minor Guilds” Mararon was in immediate agreement with what it said. In the paper, Ti’Lanar wrote “…we are creating a group of people who have no understanding of the D’ni and the strength of our blood. There is the relatively small percentage of those who learn and keep our traditions through the Guilds, and a growing population of fools…”

Mararon, following suggestions within the paper, placed the Common Schools under the Guild of Legislators and began major renovations of that system, including higher standards for instructors and longer workdays. Mararon also raised the time in the Common Schools from six years (age 10 to 16) to fifteen years (age 5 to 20). From there, instead of entering back into society, as had been the case, students could enter one of the new Minor Guilds that had been proposed by Ti’Lanar, and accepted by Mararon. The first of these Guilds included Architecture (a branch of the Guild of Stone Masons), Miners, and Educators, and Bankers among others.

While not pushing education, Mararon was focused on his own life, making sure that he was living it to the fullest. Most historical documents point to addictions to hallucinogenic drinks and various drugs. As well, it seems he carried out numerous affairs, prompting him to throw out the rules that his father had written regarding marriage and adultery. One particular record shows of affairs with prophetesses, although both the prophetesses and the religious community vehemently denied it1.

The public said little of Mararon’s shortcomings, choosing to focus more on the benefits he had brought them than the negatives. He died at the fairly early age of 235 in 1159 from natural consequences. Most expected the early death from his drinking and smoking, although many say it was somehow related to his coma years earlier.


  1. Any relationship between the King and his prophetess was extremely looked down upon as both parties were expected to remain objective with one another and the people.