King Shomat

A draft of this document, written by Nick White, was found on the Tokotah rooftop.

Shomat took the throne in the year 300 DE (D’ni Era) at the age of 44. Up to the point of his coronation, he had been a member of the Guild of Writers. He continued his study of the Art through private mentors for a number of years after his coronation. It was the lack of proper Guild instruction that most D’ni historians attribute the distorted views Shomat later took on.

It was an up and down reign, partly due to a tremendous tension that seemed to exist between himself and his older brothers. Both of the brothers, though they had little respect, did everything in their power to make Shomat’s reign tumultuous.

One of the first actions Shomat ordered was construction of a palace. When it was completed in 347 DE, Shomat moved in with his family, although his brothers refused, and maintained their own homes. Such an act was regarded as a tremendous disrespect to a family and only served to widen the gap between Shomat and his brothers.

Furthering tensions not only within Shomat’s family but within the culture as well was the lavishness of the palace. Ornate gardens were present inside the physical grounds and “garden” Ages were written as well, linking from within the palace. Rumors abounded that some of these “garden” Ages were even wiped of their inhabitants in order to provide Shomat with relaxation. Whether true or not, Shomat often spoke publicly of the need for Ages to serve D’ni. This was a first for the society and a direct contradiction to what the Guilds taught: the D’ni were to “serve” the Ages.

It seems that eventually the tension became too much. Some say it drove Shomat mad. In 387 DE both his brothers disappeared and were never found again. It was commonly presumed that Shomat wrote a Death Book to which both of his brothers were linked into, although it could never be proven.

Regardless, it was one of the first major challenges for the people of D’ni and they reacted quickly. A prophetess1 was supplied to Shomat in 400 DE in an attempt to guide him in the ways of Yahvo2. For the 155 remaining years of his reign, it seems that most people believed Shomat became a better King. The prophetess became an excellent mentor for Shomat and eventually convinced him to choose the son of one of his close friend’s as the heir to the throne. His own children were admittedly “out of control”. As it turns out, it was the bloodline of that child that led to the birth of the Great King years later.

Shomat died of natural causes at the age of 299.


  1. Women were generally seen as much better communicators with Yahvo then men. As a result, most prophets were women
  2. The choosing of prophetesses, as guides for the Kings, started with Shomat and became tradition for all the remaining Kings of D’ni. It was usually up to the King as to which prophet or prophetess he would seek for wisdom