King Ti’amel

This document was found in the Hall of Kings on Ae’gura.

Ti’amel - Took the throne in 3422 at the young age of 39. Like his father, Ti’amel’s major concern was personal pleasure. Unlike his father, he seemed to be not nearly as clever at hiding his true intentions from his people.

In spite of Ti’amel’s inability to lead, a few worthwhile historic events were carried out during his reign.

First, was the construction of Stone Eater in 3469. Though Ti’amel really had nothing to do with the Guild of Miners first colossal tunneling machine, he claimed quite a bit of the credit at it’s christening. Grand Master Namen, of the Guild of Miners, who did spearhead the effort, was irate at the lack of mention of his own name during the speech and made his thoughts public in the days that followed.

Like his father, Ti’amel carried out relations with quite a few different women, besides his wife, Shama, whom he married in 3477. Unlike his father, it was said of Ti’amel that these women, including his wife, much more easily persuaded him.

Public opinion clearly believed that Shama was a rather incredible woman. Why she stayed with him through his entire life, even through his well-publicized “affairs”, was not as clear. Some said she used Ti’amel, and the marriage, for her benefit, as she definitely had his ear1. Others said it was because she was a faithful follower of Yahvo and believed that the promise she had made to him was not meant to be broken2.

Regardless, it seems clear that Shama was an intelligent woman who, though it was never stated publicly, for all practical purposes held the throne from 3477 on.

In 3500 women became eligible for Minor Guild education. Though there had been women participation in the Minor Guilds before that point (actresses, etc…) they had never been officially recognized as members of those guilds.

Though there was a push to allow women to join the Major Guilds as well as the Minor, Shama herself gave a strong case not to allow such an event to happen in 35233. She strongly disagreed with women being in governmental positions, a seemingly ironic view as she was basically “King” of D’ni at the time of her speech. Regardless, she argued that women had much more important duties including the guiding of children. The push for such allowances seemed to fade away in the years following her speech.

In 3574, Shama gave birth to Ti’amel’s first son (at least that the public knew of). For the remaining years of Ti’amel’s reign, Shama focused on the raising of her son, whom she vowed would not be the same kind of man as his father. A daughter was born thirty years later and Shama raised her with equal resolve.

Again, though the people were not led well, they remained strong in their beliefs and purposes, somewhat ignoring the bad leadership of Ti’amel and instead focusing on the high example of his wife4.

Ti’amel passed away from an unknown disease in 3654 at the age of 271, giving the throne to his first-born son.


  1. Written by the Prophetess Athsheba in private journals
  2. From “Shama” written by Lalen in 3890
  3. Shama’s words were spoken to the Council as they debated whether or not to allow women into the Major Guilds
  4. From “The Lasting Impact” written by the grandson of Tevahr, Ailem, in 3576